ASP.NET Core debugging tips for Visual Studio Code

These days I run a Windows laptop with Visual Studio on it, but at home I still have a great Mac Machine purring away in my home office. I like that machine since it has a huge display (27 inches) and I find Mac OS still better to use then Windows.

From time to time I like to work on a side project on my Mac. These days I'm building a small web application to keep track of session proposals I sent out. I'm building this using ASP.NET Core and Visual Studio Code.

Running integration tests for ASP.NET Core apps

One of the things I really disliked about the previous versions of ASP.NET is that there's no real good way to run integration tests on your web application. You basically have to set up a full webserver to run integration tests.

Of course if you use Web API 2 or MVC 5 you have the official testhost. It solves a lot of problems, but the API is a mess to work with and very inflexible.

Using WCF in combination with .NET Core SDK

At my current project we're working hard to get a new REST API running on top of ASP.NET Core. One of the things we need to do is communicate with a set of existing WCF Services in the back office of the company.

This means we need WCF clients inside our ASP.NET Core project. Something that isn't very simple as it turns out. <!-- more -->

Why you should try F#

A few weeks ago I gave F# a shot, I have my personal reasons for doing this. But I can imagine you are confused about this sudden move. Why should you even try this weird language? Almost nobody uses it!

You are right, not a lot of people use F# in their projects. But there are a few reasons why I think you should give it a shot for a hobby project. <!-- more -->

Getting started with F# on your mac

Functional programming is becoming a thing. More and more people are talking about it. I used to use Scala for a lot of projects, but always wondered about F#.

Last week I swallowed the blue pill and dived into this remarkable language. As with with all languages I tried to get F# up and running on my Macbook.

project.json is going away and it's a good thing

During the last community standup of the ASP.NET core team Damien announced that project.json is going away. This spurred a discussion on twitter that left me with the feeling that this is a bad thing.

I think my fellow tweeps are wrong on this matter and here's why.